Don’t waste your time with a hybrid cloud

I’m often asked about paired private and public clouds, aka hybrid clouds. What are they? How do you use them? Should you use them?

I’m not talking about hybrid clouds that are defined as traditional systems paired with public clouds or as multicloud architectures composed of more than one public cloud, but hybrid clouds as defined by NIST in 2011. The definition is important because I’m finding that people use the “hybrid cloud” term very sloppily still.

The problem with hybrid clouds is that they are typically defined to be paired private and public clouds, which is the correct definition. The problem with this architecture is that they have the concept of “private cloud” in the architecture, and that dog does not seem to hunt anymore. 

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Fix your databases now as you migrate to the cloud

If you have lame databases in your on-premises systems, don’t move them to the cloud. They’ll still be lame databases.

As thousands of enterprises move their application workloads and data to the cloud, too many move whatever they have, include their lame databases. It’s easy to just lift and shift them you’ll find the popular on-premises databases also available in the cloud. So you end up with the same limitations, just running somewhere new.

Don’t do that. Instead, reevaluate the type, and the brand of databases you’re using as part of your cloud migration.

Use the cloud migration effort to vastly improve your data management and data use capabilities. For example, consider moving from SQL or relational databases to NoSQL or object-based databases, which maybe a better fit for your patterns of data use.

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You need a cloud exit plan, even for AWS, Google, Microsoft, or IBM

The cloud computing infrastructure market—IaaS, PaaS, and private hosting—continues to consolidate around the four major providers, as they maintain or even grow market share at the expense of smaller providers.

AWS has continued to grow its revenues more rapidly than the overall market. In other words, AWS is the one to beat, and it will likely remain so for sometime. According to Synergy Research Group’s Q2 2017 data, AWS now has 34 percent of the cloud infrastructure market share, followed by Microsoft at 11 percent, IBM at 8 percent, and Google at 5 percent.

This latest data underscores a long-term trend of consolidation, and that’s something enterprises need a strategy for.

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